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  1. First we get a list of all physical links on the system with dladm show-phys, which returns a list generally ordered as described in the Summary above. You will note that interfaces here are of two types, igb and ixgbe. Interfaces identified as igb0 will invariably be 1GbE capable, but actual speed of course could be lower, depending on the switch end. Interfaces identified as ixgbe0 will be 10GbE capable, and could be either 10GBaseT or SFP+.

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    # dladm show-phys
    LINK         MEDIA                STATE      SPEED  DUPLEX    DEVICE
    ixgbe0       Ethernet             down       0      unknown   ixgbe0
    ixgbe1       Ethernet             down       0      unknown   ixgbe1
    igb0         Ethernet             up         1000   full      igb0
    igb1         Ethernet             unknown    0      half      igb1
    igb2         Ethernet             unknown    0      half      igb2
    igb3         Ethernet             unknown    0      half      igb3
  2.  In this step we will create a virtual interface on ixgbe0 called data0. Virtual interfaces give us the ability to create many instances of a network interface with a unique MAC and IP address over a single physical link. Unlike an alias, resulting interface would have a unique MAC, which in effect presents it as a completely independent interface from any other created over this physical link. ARP tables on remote devices will treat each such interface as though it is an entirely stand-alone physical interface.

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    # dladm create-vnic -l ixgbe0 data0

    If we want to create an interface that uses VLAN tags, we have to alter the command slightly. We are going to assume that we want to use VLAN ID 10, and it is perhaps reasonable to consider including the ID in the name of the resulting virtual interface. In this case we could choose to name it data10010, where the part after 100 correlates with vlan ID. The reason for having 100 as a prefix is actually idiosyncratic implementation of the interface naming standard, which does not allow for leading zeroes, unless 0 is the ONLY digit that follows prefix, such as data0, in other words this is illegal: data010, but it is also perfectly fine to assume some sequentially incrementing value prefixed with word data, in cases where some number of tagged interfaces is required. In this example we still use same name as above, the only difference being -v argument and its parameter.

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    # dladm create-vnic -l ixgbe0 -v10 data0
  3. Next, we need to place an IP interface over this newly created virtual interface (vnic). An IP interface is necessary to be able to assign an IP address to a given interface.

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    # ipadm create-if data0
  4. Now we will assign a static IPv4 address 10.1.2.25 with a /24 subnet to the data0 virtual interface (vnic).

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    # ipadm create-addr –T static –a local=10.1.2.25/24 data0/v4

    If the interface is meant to be dynamically addressed, please use the following command instead.

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    # ipadm create-addr –T dhcp data0/v4

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